wound


wound
01. My grandfather was [wounded] in the leg during the war.
02. Many soldiers died of their [wounds] in the First World War because medical science wasn't as advanced back then as it is today.
03. A homemade bomb exploded on the bus, killing 3, and [wounding] at least a dozen others.
04. The dead soldiers were quickly buried, and the [wounded] were taken out by helicopter to a nearby field hospital.
05. The [wound] in her heart is deep.
06. There is a Yiddish proverb which notes that a [wounded] soul is difficult to heal.
07. The Buddha stated that an insincere and evil friend is more to be feared than a wild beast; a wild beast may [wound] your body, but an evil friend will [wound] your mind.
08. During the Vietnam war, about two million people died, four million were [wounded], and six million were left homeless.
09. An incredible 15% of the population in Lebanon had a family member killed, [wounded] or kidnapped during the war there.
10. A recent study shows that couples in unhappy marriages take longer than the happily married to heal from all kinds of [wounds].
11. There is an Iranian proverb which observes that an arrow can be pulled out of a [wound], but a hurtful word stays forever in your heart.
12. During his time as President, Ronald Reagan was seriously [wounded] by a gunman who tried to assassinate him.
13. The [wounded] must be treated quickly or their injuries could become seriously infected.
14. There is a Turkish proverb which states that a knife [wound] heals, whereas a [wound] caused by words does not.
15. Bubbles, our cat, sat in the corner licking its [wounds] after fighting with our neighbor's dog.
16. In 1805, British naval hero Lord Horatio Nelson was mortally [wounded] in the hour of victory over the French fleet at Trafalgar.
17. Pope John Paul II was shot and [wounded] as he drove through a crowd in St. Peter's Square in Rome in 1981.
18. Shakespeare once exclaimed, "How poor are they that have not patience. What [wound] did ever heal but by degrees?"
19. J. C. Macaulay once advised, "Keep your heart right, even when it is sorely [wounded]."
20. Shakespeare once noted that a smile cures the [wounding] of a frown.
21. I [wound] my watch before going to sleep.
22. The train we took [wound] its way across the country for about a week.
23. He [wound] the electrical cord around the base of the microphone so that no one could trip over it.
24. The little girl [wound] up the music box, and then laughed with delight as the song played, and the little ballerina danced around in a circle.

Grammatical examples in English. 2013.

Synonyms:
, (for example, a cut, stab, bruise, etc.), , , , (with some weapon or such agency) / , , , , , , , , , / (of the mind or feelings), , , , , , , , , ,


Look at other dictionaries:

  • wound — n Wound, trauma, traumatism, lesion, bruise, contusion are comparable when they mean an injury to one of the organs or parts of the body. Wound generally denotes an injury that is inflicted by a hard or sharp instrument (as a knife, a bullet, or… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • Wound — Wound, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Wounded}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Wounding}.] [AS. wundian. [root]140. See {Wound}, n.] [1913 Webster] 1. To hurt by violence; to produce a breach, or separation of parts, in, as by a cut, stab, blow, or the like. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • wound — wound1 [wo͞ond] n. [ME wunde < OE wund, akin to Ger wunde < IE * wen , var. of base * wā , to hit, wound > WEN1] 1. an injury to the body in which the skin or other tissue is broken, cut, pierced, torn, etc. 2. an injury to a plant… …   English World dictionary

  • Wound — (?; 277), n. [OE. wounde, wunde, AS. wund; akin to OFries. wunde, OS. wunda, D. wonde, OHG. wunta, G. wunde, Icel. und, and to AS., OS., & G. wund sore, wounded, OHG. wunt, Goth. wunds, and perhaps also to Goth. winnan to suffer, E. win.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • wound — [n] injury anguish, bruise, cut, damage, distress, gash, grief, harm, heartbreak, hurt, insult, laceration, lesion, pain, pang, shock, slash, torment, torture, trauma; concept 309 wound [v1] cause bodily damage bruise, carve, clip*, contuse, cut …   New thesaurus

  • wound´ed|ly — wound|ed «WOON dihd», adjective, noun. –adj. 1. suffering from a wound or wounds: »Kay near him groaning like a wounded bull (Tennyson). 2. Figurative. deeply pained or grieved: »The quiet of my wounded conscience (Shakespeare). –n. the wounded,… …   Useful english dictionary

  • wound|ed — «WOON dihd», adjective, noun. –adj. 1. suffering from a wound or wounds: »Kay near him groaning like a wounded bull (Tennyson). 2. Figurative. deeply pained or grieved: »The quiet of my wounded conscience (Shakespeare). –n. the wounded, those who …   Useful english dictionary

  • wound´i ly — wound|y «WOON dee», adjective. Especially British Dialect. very great; extreme; excessive. ╂[< (God s) wound(s), an oath, swounds + y1] –wound´i ly, adverb …   Useful english dictionary

  • wound|y — «WOON dee», adjective. Especially British Dialect. very great; extreme; excessive. ╂[< (God s) wound(s), an oath, swounds + y1] –wound´i ly, adverb …   Useful english dictionary

  • Wound — Wound, imp. & p. p. of {Wind} to twist, and {Wind} to sound by blowing. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • wound up — [ˌwaund ˈʌp] adj [not before noun] anxious, worried, or excited ▪ I was too wound up to sleep …   Dictionary of contemporary English